The Book of Common Prayer from the Outside

  • Course Dates: Thursday, 15 Nov 2012, 12:00 PM - Friday, 16 Nov 2012, 2:00 PM

An Ecumenical Symposium
Celebrating the 350th
Anniversary of the 1662
Prayer Book.

Thursday 15 to Friday 16 November 2012

The conference programme begins with lunch at 1pm. Departures 2pm on day two.

The symposium brings together leading denominational representatives to consider how the 1662 Book of Common Prayer has influenced public worship in churches beyond the Church of England. Worship in some traditions has been formed as an alternative to the Prayer Book, whereas in others there has been an accommodation of the Prayer Book, and in yet others a more independent appreciation of the language, theology or spirituality of the Prayer Book.

This public forum is a unique opportunity for conversation, listening and debate in response to a book that has had an indelible impact upon the landscape of public prayer in the English speaking world. A series of lectures will be given by scholars and leaders of worship variety of traditions (including Baptist, Methodist, Roman Catholic, and Reformed traditions) together with perspectives from the use and revision of the Prayer Book in the wider Anglican Communion.

Participants are invited to attend the RSCM Celebratory 350th Book of Common Prayer Service at 12pm on the first day in the Sarum College Chapel. There will also be evening and morning services that will use the Book of Common Prayer. A concluding forum will include a response by a member of the Church of Englandís Liturgical Commission.

Prices


Full symposium (Thurs & Fri) £50 non-residential; £95 residential (en-suite)
Prices include all meals and refreshments. Non-residential bookings exclude breakfast.

Thursday only (2pm to 8.30pm) £21. Includes evening dinner and refreshments.
Friday only (9.15am to 1pm) £21. Includes lunch and refreshments.

Contact Alison Ogden for booking enquiries.
aogden@sarum.ac.uk | 01722 424826

Symposium Programme


Thursday 15th November
You are invited to arrive early to attend the 12.00 service. The conference programme begins with lunch at 13.00.

12.00    RSCM Celebratory 350th Book of Common Prayer Service, Sarum College Chapel
13.00    Lunch
14.00    James Steven – Ecumenical Perspectives on the Book of Common Prayer
14.30    Chris Ellis – Out of the Believer’s Heart: Orality and Text in Liturgical Spirituality
15.30    Tea break
16.00    Susan Durber – Voices from the Rift:  A Reformed Reassessment of the 1662 BCP
17.30    Evensong (Book of Common Prayer) at the Cathedral
18.00    Bar open, followed by Dinner at 18.30
19.15    Alan Griffiths – The Imprint of the BCP: A Roman Catholic Liturgist’s Tale

Friday 16th November
07.30    Anglican morning prayer and Holy Communion – Cathedral (optional)
08.20    Breakfast for residential guests
09.15    Norman Wallwork – The Prayer Book Legacy in British Methodism
10.05    David Frost – The Influence of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer on the Orthodox: Opening a Can of Worms?
10.55    Coffee break
11.30    Colin Buchanan – The 1662 BCP in the Anglican Communion at large
12.20    Concluding Forum
13.00    Lunch

Thursday Presentations


Ecumenical Perspectives on the Book of Common Prayer
Setting the theme for the symposium this is a review of previous ecumenical dialogues concerning the place of the Book of Common Prayer in the modern era.

James Steven


Out of the Believer’s Heart: Orality and Text in Liturgical Spirituality
For most of their history Baptists have had little to do with the Book of Common Prayer, viewing it with aggrieved suspicion and spiritual condescension. From John Bunyan’s prison cell to the contemporary  ‘praise and worship’ scene, the use of pre-composed prayers has been rejected in favour of what is believed to be spontaneous and sincere extempore prayer. By examining the Civil War context of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, Chris will reflect on the nature of the disagreements over common prayer and explore the spirituality of oral worship and the liturgical borrowings of more recent ecumenical relationships.

Chris Ellis


Voices from the Rift:  A Reformed Reassessment of the 1662 BCP
The Book of Common Prayer is a beautiful instrument of oppression. It represents a moment when a costly decisions had to be made, a time when some found themselves on the ‘losing side of history’ and had to leave fellowship, home, church and status behind. But much of its text was thought, then and now, to be beautiful and helpful to prayer and its phrases have become part of the text of English spirituality even beyond the Church of England. What has it left behind among the heirs of those who were ejected in 1662 and how shall we read it now?

Susan Durber


The Imprint of the BCP: A Roman Catholic Liturgist’s Tale
This more personal account considers the ways in which Alan’s religious and spiritual outlook and professional work as a liturgical translator and drafter have been influenced by the Prayer Book. In particular he will make some observations on the BCP and liturgical ‘order’ as a pastoral value, as well as some assessment of the daily morning and evening prayer rituals as liturgies that ‘fit’ much of the recent post Vatican II teaching about the importance of the Word of God in Catholic spirituality.

Alan Griffiths

Friday Presentations


The Prayer Book Legacy in British Methodism
Wesley published the first British edition of his conservative abridgement of the 1662 Prayer Book, The Sunday Service of the Methodists, in 1786 and its communion order in particular pre-dominated in the majority of Methodist Eucharistic worship until the 1960s.  Against a Tractarian background the Wesleyan Methodists affirmed but revised their Prayer Book services throughout the 19th century. The principles of the Book of Common Prayer – collects, calendar, lectionary, daily and public prayer and its ordinal – have left their mark on the approach and content of the current Methodist Worship Book and shaped a considerable part of present day Methodist liturgy.

Norman Wallwork


The Influence of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer on the Orthodox: Opening a Can of Worms?
Though the Book of Common Prayer was not unknown to Orthodox before the 20th century, knowledge was restricted largely to those charged with assessing approaches from Protestants who sought an alternative to Rome as a source of continuity, and to those who were sympathetic to attempts to establish in the west an Orthodox Church that used western rites. Only after the Russian Bishop Tikhon of North America (later to become Patriarch of Moscow) considered introducing a ‘Western Rite’ drawing on the 1892 version of the Book of Common Prayer did Anglican services have any significant impact beyond that of establishing a liturgical diction by which to translate the ancient services of the Church into English. The Western Rite with its variants and off-shoots has been mainly used in America by Christians joining from other denominations, and hence has been rejected by many as a halfway-house for those not ready to be fully Orthodox. A more serious objection is that the theology and anthropology of the Book of Common Prayer is not compatible with Orthodox doctrine as found in the ancient liturgies.

David Frost


The 1662 BCP in the Anglican Communion at large
Colin will consider the influence of the Book of Common Prayer as a norm for global Anglicanism, as evidenced in the Prayer Book’s role in the era of worldwide missionary expansion. Its function as a bond of the Anglican Communion will be discussed, as will the challenges to this liturgical and ideological dominance since the 1950s.  He will conclude with an assessment of its present-day role in the Communion.

Colin Buchanan


Concluding Forum
Bridget Nichols will make a response to the symposium papers on behalf of the Church of England’s Liturgical Commission.

Prices


Full symposium (Thurs & Fri) £50 non-residential; £95 residential (en-suite)
Prices include all meals and refreshments. Non-residential bookings exclude breakfast.

Thursday only (2pm to 8.30pm) £21. Includes evening dinner and refreshments.
Friday only (9.15am to 1pm) £21. Includes lunch and refreshments.

Contact Alison Ogden for booking enquiries.
aogden@sarum.ac.uk | 01722 424826

Course Details:

  • Starts: Thursday, 15 Nov 2012, 12:00 PM
  • Ends: Friday, 16 Nov 2012, 2:00 PM
  • Tutors:
  • Tutor: James Steven

    • Dr James Steven is the convenor of the symposium and programme leader in liturgy and worship at Sarum College.

  • Tutor: Chris Ellis

    • The Revd Dr Chris Ellis is pastor of West Bridgford Baptist Church, Nottingham, and vice president of the Baptist Union of Great Britain. He has ministered in various churches in England and Wales and from 2000-2006 was the principal of Bristol Baptist College. More recently, he has taught spiritual and liturgical theology in the University of Nottingham. He co-edited Patterns and Prayers and Gathering for Worship, the two most recent worship resource books for the Baptist Union. He has a particular interest in art and spirituality.

  • Tutor: Susan Durber

    • Susan Durber is a minister of the United Reformed Church and principal of Westminster College Cambridge. She has served pastorates in Manchester, Salford and Oxford, has a PhD on the parables and is a member of the Standing Commission for Faith and Order of the World Council of Churches.

  • Tutor: Norman Wallwork

    • Prebendary Norman Wallwork is a supernumerary Methodist minister in Exeter and a former associate tutor in liturgy at Wesley College, Bristol. He serves on the Joint Liturgical Group of Great Britain and was a major contributor to The Methodist Worship Book. Norman is Chair of the Methodist Prayer Handbook Committee and along with the former Abbot of Downside is an ecumenical canon of Wells Cathedral.

  • Tutor: Alan Griffiths

    • The Revd Canon Alan Griffiths is a priest in the Catholic Diocese of Portsmouth and lecturer in liturgical studies at St. John's Seminary Wonersh. He spent seven years in the Venerable English College Rome and was ordained as a priest in 1974. He has spent some 20 years in parish ministry and more than 12 years in seminary as a teacher. He has also been a university chaplain.

  • Tutor: Colin Buchanan

    • The Rt Revd Colin Buchanan was ordained as a deacon in 1961, and in 1964 began lecturing in liturgy at the London College of Divinity (now St John's, Nottingham). After 21 years there (six as principal), he became bishop, first of Aston and later of Woolwich. In 1971 he began the series of Grove Booklets. He has published four volumes of Eucharistic liturgies around the Anglican Communion, was a founder-member of the International Anglican Liturgical Consultations and continues as a member today.

  • Tutor: David Frost

    • Dr David Frost is professor emeritus in English Literature at the University of Newcastle, New South Wales, and principal of the Institute for Orthodox Christian Studies, Cambridge. While a fellow of St John’s College, Cambridge, teaching mainly Renaissance literature, he became a member of the Church of England Liturgical Commission. He was chrismated Orthodox in 1996, and has translated the liturgies of St John Chrysostom and St Basil the Great into modern English for use in the Antiochian Orthodox Church of Australasia.

  • Tutor: Bridget Nichols

    • Dr Bridget Nichols is chair of the Society for Liturgical Studies and member of the Church of England Liturgical Commission. She lives and works in Ely as the lay chaplain to the Bishop of Ely. She recently edited a collection of essays entitled, The Collect in the Churches of the Reformation (SCM, 2010).